May 2006

Show Us Your Shorts

The internet gives short films a whole new audience


“I don’t know how big of a historian you are,” begins David Dundas, one of the founders of YouAreTV, a video hosting site launched at the beginning of this year. “But this whole technology thing is kind of equivalent to when the printing press came out.”

Q&A - Larry Clark

Larry Clark's new film Wassup Rockers will shock you


Larry Clark’s films are shocking. There’s Kids, about drug-using, AIDS-carrying,
sexually active Manhattan teenagers; Bully, the true story of a group of teens who
murder their tormentor; and Ken Park, which was so sexually explicit, it was never released in the U.S. These films are shocking because they capture a reality most people don’t want to know exists.

One-Two Punch

From script to screen, Shadowboxer’s wild ride


I thought that making Monster’s Ball was rough. I vowed upon wrapping that film that I would never make another. After the accolades and success of that film, I was offered tons of projects from studios for lots of money (which I really could have used.) But all of them were jokes: Who’s My Baby’s Cousin’s Daddy, Leprechauns From the Hood (really).

Q&A - James Schamus

James Schamus on Brokeback Mountain, Focus Features, and the rest of his legacy.


Writer, producer, and film executive James Schamus has had about as brilliant a career in independent film as they come, and it just keeps getting better.

On the Margins of the Multiplex

Young visionaries bring indie cinemas to small cities


Group shot of The Film Streams Cinema Project.

In 1973, a young, cinema-loving bohemian couple fled the high rents of Manhattan for the more affordable suburbs of Huntington, NY. Once there, Vic Skolnick and Charlotte Sky found that they had also fled, inadvertently, the vibrant independent cinema scene in New York City, which was then in its heyday, with more than a dozen arthouses sprinkled throughout the boroughs.

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